You never know who will walk-in

Having diverse skills is valuable because you can handle any type of request without fear. Gain experience with as many different types of people and their hair so you don’t disappoint them with inadequacy.

Just last weekend a charming young man waits patiently for an hour, he just happened upon the salon. I noticed him noticing my make client before him as he left and when it was his turn he complimented my work and had confidence that he would be happy with whatever I wanted to do.

He mentioned, “don’t mind the blue glue behind my ears.” Well that’s odd-so of course I took the bait- what is it?
He happens to be one of the traveling performers for Blue Man Group, the show that evening and the next day was nearby. So here I have a well received actor and musician (drummer) in my chair trusting I do anything. He wears a bald cap for work so as long as it’s shorter he had no parameters. Being fairly mild in appearance I chose a much more mainstream haircut, one that the girlfriend back home certainly will approve he beamed. As a performer he has an outgoing nature so I worked a little funky magic in that can either be enhanced with product or ignored for modesty.

I certainly enjoyed meeting Steven, a pleasure to work with on all accounts. I am also grateful for all the training I have so I could adapt to the changing needs of my small towns client base

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Why kids can’t come with me to work

I often think of opening my own salon just so my kids can be there too. After all, what is the problem with children anyway? They are just smaller, younger versions of us. I dream of a mommy hair salon where there is a room dedicated to just the children for playing, and I imagine it being very busy during the day, because quite frankly, mothers can now get their hair done without having to also pay/find a babysitter. That way my kids can be there too. I can work for my family, and also be with my kids.

Over the years I am certain one of my three daughters will be interested in my craft and will learn a lot just by being around it. Maybe I will be benefitting them in the long run.

The problems
1. Health: It is not the best environment for young growing bodies to be exposed to regularly. There are chemicals and debris.
2. Neediness: My children are very young still and often want me to hold them. If I can’t because I am in the middle of applying a highlight- and one of them (or even two) are crying- that is a huge disappointment to them and even worse it is a distraction to me and my client.

The advantages
1. My kids can learn that women can work too and kids aren’t taboo.
2. My kids will learn and see the practice of business skills and ethics that I mostly learned by mentoring the salon owners and colleagues I had from my own young career days. Sorry mom and dad (who probably will never read this because he isn’t a thoughtful parent) but you didn’t teach me much about business when I was young.
3. Convenience for me and other mothers who also tote kids with them everywhere.

I am always spotting little salons that are out of business. I could also quickly move into a small houses that would be easy to convert because the separated rooms are already in place. It is just a matter of getting the upfront funding to open, and marketing for the clientele. Which I have learned is not that difficult if you have done it before and know what works and what doesn’t.

In all honesty, it is a dream, but will probably only ever be a dream because it isn’t worth it for the two problems. If over time we overcome the second, the first will always be a deal-breaker.